Time-tested French confections + a killer space make Colorova the left bank’s best new salon de thé. My latest for the NYT T Magazine. Click HERE to read! 

Time-tested French confections + a killer space make Colorova the left bank’s best new salon de thé. My latest for the NYT T Magazine. Click HERE to read! 

Following its resounding success in New York, Melbourne, Toronto, and Los Angeles, “Tim Burton” -  the itinerant exhibition tracing the eccentric filmmaker’s enchantingly macabre universe from past to present– has made its final stop in Paris at the illustrious Cinémathèque Française. 
There’s no mistaking the very personal, childhood demons in Tim Burton’s work – his dynamic stories and atmospheric films reflect a playful darkness that are unique to his somewhat marginalized upbringing in Burbank, California. Edward Scissorhands, Alice in Wonderland, and Sweeney Todd are all universally recognizable characters from Burton’s brooding imagination but few have been exposed to his other work, composed largely of pop art and zealous sketches from his days as a student at the California Institute of Art. 
Widely regarded as “the seventh art”, film has always held a hallowed role in French culture and Burton’s subversive style and gothic leanings have long been lauded by French moviegoers and critics. Through August 5, 2012, visitors have access to over 700 drawings, photographs, costumes, figurines and film artifacts, many on display for the first time, in addition to a comprehensive film retrospective including limited-distribution shorts and extracts from his forthcoming projects. 
After discovering the exhibit organized by New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 2009, Serge Toubiana, director of the museum which hosts one of the world’s most extensive film archives, was intent on bringing it to Europe. He explained, “I had the pleasure of convincing our friends at the MoMA to accept continuing the exhibition’s itinerary all the way to Paris. The decisive element was the enthusiastic agreement of Tim Burton”. 
Cinemathèque Française
51 rue de Bercy, 75012 Paris
(Closed Tuesdays)
Written by: Lindsey Tramuta

Following its resounding success in New York, Melbourne, Toronto, and Los Angeles, “Tim Burton” -  the itinerant exhibition tracing the eccentric filmmaker’s enchantingly macabre universe from past to present– has made its final stop in Paris at the illustrious Cinémathèque Française.

There’s no mistaking the very personal, childhood demons in Tim Burton’s work – his dynamic stories and atmospheric films reflect a playful darkness that are unique to his somewhat marginalized upbringing in Burbank, California. Edward Scissorhands, Alice in Wonderland, and Sweeney Todd are all universally recognizable characters from Burton’s brooding imagination but few have been exposed to his other work, composed largely of pop art and zealous sketches from his days as a student at the California Institute of Art.

Widely regarded as “the seventh art”, film has always held a hallowed role in French culture and Burton’s subversive style and gothic leanings have long been lauded by French moviegoers and critics. Through August 5, 2012, visitors have access to over 700 drawings, photographs, costumes, figurines and film artifacts, many on display for the first time, in addition to a comprehensive film retrospective including limited-distribution shorts and extracts from his forthcoming projects.

After discovering the exhibit organized by New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 2009, Serge Toubiana, director of the museum which hosts one of the world’s most extensive film archives, was intent on bringing it to Europe. He explained, “I had the pleasure of convincing our friends at the MoMA to accept continuing the exhibition’s itinerary all the way to Paris. The decisive element was the enthusiastic agreement of Tim Burton”.

Cinemathèque Française

51 rue de Bercy, 75012 Paris

(Closed Tuesdays)

Written by: Lindsey Tramuta

My first (and hopefully not last) piece for the New York Times!
Fashion Playground|The Colette Carnaval, T-Magazine 

My first (and hopefully not last) piece for the New York Times!

Fashion Playground|The Colette Carnaval, T-Magazine 

A Joyeuse Saint-Valentin to all, from Ladurée! 
(Photo: Lindsey Tramuta ©

A Joyeuse Saint-Valentin to all, from Ladurée! 

(Photo: Lindsey Tramuta ©

Merry-Go-Round, Paris. 
More Paris photos HERE. 

Merry-Go-Round, Paris. 

More Paris photos HERE

Everyone’s favorite pastime in Paris: people watching 

Postcard from Paris 

Postcard from Paris 

Real Southern comfort fried chicken does exist in Paris. But it took American chefs from Seattle to do it. More on this gourmet bar food HERE. 
{photo: copyright Lindsey Tramuta}

Real Southern comfort fried chicken does exist in Paris. But it took American chefs from Seattle to do it. More on this gourmet bar food HERE

{photo: copyright Lindsey Tramuta}

Place de la Concorde, Dec 10, 3:20pm #paris  (Taken with Instagram at Place de la Concorde)

Place de la Concorde, Dec 10, 3:20pm #paris (Taken with Instagram at Place de la Concorde)

My blog Lost In Cheeseland is currently ranked among the top 20 travel blogs in the Paris Golden Blog Awards and I would love your help! Voting is open until October 26th, could you give me a click? Just hit the blue “VOTEZ” button HERE!

My blog Lost In Cheeseland is currently ranked among the top 20 travel blogs in the Paris Golden Blog Awards and I would love your help! Voting is open until October 26th, could you give me a click? Just hit the blue “VOTEZ” button HERE!


Best place for scones in Paris - Pain et Chocolat. Get the full breakfast. 
More photos HERE. 

Best place for scones in Paris - Pain et Chocolat. Get the full breakfast. 

More photos HERE

The patty was fatty. Just as it should be. Delicious burger at Le Floréal, 75010. More photos and words HERE. 

The patty was fatty. Just as it should be. Delicious burger at Le Floréal, 75010. More photos and words HERE

Baguette slice in hand, you can spot the little French girl a mile away.
©Lindsey Tramuta 

Baguette slice in hand, you can spot the little French girl a mile away.

©Lindsey Tramuta 

Americans have always honored Paris: they appreciate it as a bulwark against ugly modernity, it’s the anti-America, the place where beauty and reason resist the sterile blandishments of Hollywood and therapy and plastic surgery and consumerism and talk-show emotions.

 -Holdforth 

{sent to me by @elledeejo}

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY